Minor (major?) irritations and working siblings

Gel ended up in the dog house after the fiasco we had moving the ewes and lambs yesterday morning.  On Sunday, Wally and I brought home the buck I talked about earlier and Gel is quick to get excited about new stock.  When the ewes and lambs first got over here, he was hot on them.  Now it’s that damned buck.  When I finished milking, we put the goats in the duck and chicken pasture and then pulled the ewes and lambs out of the fenced-in area and proceeded down to the ElectroNet.  All seemed fine when I put them up, turned on the power and headed back up to the house to put the goats back in the fenced-in area.  When I got back, I realized Gel had left four ewes and two lambs behind who were very happily consuming the chicken and duck food.  When I sent him around to pick them up, he locked in on the buck (who was trying to get at the chicken and duck food himself) and ignored the ewes and lambs.

Jerk!

We managed to get the ewes and lambs down to the ElectroNet, but his work was sloppy and I got mad at him.  One of the lambs who went down with the first batch belonged to a ewe who got left behind so as soon as they saw each other, it became mayhem.  The madder I got at Gel because he was not being effective at getting the ewes and lambs back into the ElectroNet, the wider he flanked until he flanked completely out of sight.  I managed to get the ewes and lambs up by myself, but not before a few lambs went through the ElectroNet (I had turned the power off), which is a practice I don’t want them getting into for fear that they’ll try to do it when the power is on.

Needless to say, I was pissed.  Gel hadn’t returned by the time I got the ewes and lambs up, so I went back up to move the goats back into the fenced-in area on my own.  Bad mistake.  As soon as I let them out, two dove into the chicken and duck food and two more went back to where they had been grained that morning.  Shoot!  I got even more pissed.  I looked out into the back field and there’s Gel bringing up the wether and ewe flock which was where he disappeared to.  I recalled him and we got the goats up, but Rose had gone out while I was trying to catch them myself and then I couldn’t catch her.

God, sometimes I wonder if it wouldn’t be easier if I was living in a subdivision with a couple of cats and a Poodle.

On a good note, I had the opportunity to work Cian’s sister, Kessie yesterday.  She works quite like Cian, but she doesn’t get into that wild, off-the-wall running that Cian does.  I sent her for the wether and young ewe flock in a manner that she’d have to move them against pressure (bringing them to me in a direction they didn’t want to go) and she was having a hard time lifting them.  She tried flanking back and forth a few times, but no where near like what Cian would do.

When it looked like she wasn’t going to be able to lift them, I sent Fern to help.  That gave Kessie the confidence she needed and she blew in and busted up the sheep.  Of course, I don’t want her blowing in on her lift, but for now, until she builds her confidence, it’s okay.  I wish Cian would blow in some, maybe one day he will.  Male dogs often take a lot longer to build confidence than females.  Needless to say, I was quite pleased with how Kessie worked yesterday.  I purchased Kessie as a puppy from her breeder and ended up giving her to Wally when she was about six months old.  That might have might have been a mistake on my part, but Wally is very happy to have her so I guess it is a good thing.  The reason why I decided to give her to Wally was because I thought she was going to be too soft and quirky for trialing.  That may very well be the case, but I did make that decision too quickly.  It doesn’t matter too much because I now have her brother to work and I think I might put more time into working Kessie.  Like her brother, she lives to to work stock.  The more dogs I can work, the more experienced I’ll become.  While Kessie works like Cian, she’s different enough for me to learn as much from her as I am from Cian.

Until later …